High Testosterone Levels in Women: Everything You Need to Know – Keto for Women

High Testosterone Levels in Women: Everything You Need to Know – Keto for Women

High testosterone levels in women is one of the most common hormone disorders. Literally tens of millions of women suffer from it in the United States alone. So how do you know if you have high testosterone?

1. Acne

Testosterone is elevated around ovulation cycles if you are menstruating which can lead to hormonal acne breakouts commonly around your jaw or chin. If you have PCOS you may be suffering from breakouts like these most of the time. (If you suffer from acne, my brand new program, 50% off this week, Clear Skin Unlocked: The Ultimate Guide to Acne Freedom and Flawless Skincould be a great resource for you).

2. Irregular Menstrual Cycles

Having irregular menstrual cycles creates a hormonal balance allowing testosterone to become dominant or recessive. Another reason you may be having irregular menstrual cycles could be stemming from PCOS.

3. Blood Sugar Swings

Insulin encourages the ovaries to produce more testosterone.

4. Low Libido

Your testosterone levels can be high but if your other primary sex hormones are not balanced, then high testosterone will not result in higher libido.

5. Male Pattern Balding and Hair Growth

Another sign of high testosterone levels in women is male pattern balding and hair growth.

 

So what causes testosterone levels in women to be elevated?


1. Insulin Resistance and Diabetes

If you have type I or II diabetes or know that you are insulin resistant, high testosterone is probably a problem for you.

Approximately 25% of the testosterone in female bodies comes from the ovaries. This is natural. However, insulin in the bloodstream stimulates the ovaries to produce more testosterone. This can seriously increase the ovaries’ output of testosterone.Depending on the severity of the dysregulation, insulin can lead to a significant increase in testosterone in the bloodstream. This is as much as 2 or 3 times over the optimal and healthy testosterone levels.

This is very often the case in polycystic ovarian syndrome.

2. Thyroid Disorders

Sex hormone levels and thyroid hormone levels are intimately related in many ways.

One important way is through Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG). When thyroid function slows — as in hypothyroidism — SHBG levels fall. SHBG binds excess hormones to it in the blood. It is incredibly important for maintaining healthy hormone balance. When hormones like testosterone threaten to increase and there is bountiful SHBG then it can bind the testosterone and minimize its threat. Without SHBG, excessive hormones can become a real problem.

In healthy women, 80% of testosterone is bound by SHBG in the blood. With decreased SHBG however, significantly more testosterone runs free and causes testosterone-related issues.

3. Stress

Stress can have a wide variety of negative impacts on the female body. Many of these have the potential to elevate testosterone levels.For example, stress can cause hypothyroidism and the concomitant decreases in SHBG.Stress can also decrease levels of estrogen and progesterone in the blood. Estrogen and progesterone perform a counter-balancing function to testosterone. Without them, testosterone levels in women can rise to unhealthy levels.

Stress also causes a rise in DHEA-S, which is a male sex hormone produced by the adrenal glands. It is not testosterone – but it is one of testosterone’s closest cousins. It acts in a chemically similar way and will often cause the same hormone disruptions. Read more about this process here, and about how stress negatively impacts hormone production here.

sleep and stress effect testosterone, high testosterone levels in women

4. Fasting After Workouts

If you work out frequently and do not eat afterwards, your testosterone levels – specifically as a woman, can rise. After intense exercise, several hormone levels are elevated including Cortisol – the “stress hormone” – and testosterone.

Cortisol levels fall naturally after a workout. But testosterone levels do not. They remain very high and decrease much more slowly if you do not eat afterward. If you do this on a regular or even daily basis this can cause a chronic problem.

high testosterone levels in women increase from fasting

5. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Finally, the most common cause of high testosterone in women is PCOS.


Read about the in’s and out’s of PCOS


Now, it is not altogether clear what causes what: does high testosterone cause PCOS, or does PCOS cause high testosterone levels in women? There is no certain answer. But what is certain is that the two are inextricably linked for many women. It may very well be the case that they both cause each other: high testosterone causes PCOS and PCOS causes high testosterone.

PCOS stands for Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome and is the condition of having multiple cysts on one’s ovaries. There are three criteria used in diagnosing PCOS. In order to be diagnosed you must meet two of the three criteria:

  • irregular or absent menstrual cycles
  • elevated testosterone or other male sex hormone levels
  • cysts on the ovaries as demonstrated by an ultrasound

PCOS affects as many as 15% of in America today, and is actually the leading cause of infertility, by a long shot.

So if you suffer from symptoms of high testosterone, from any of the above conditions such as hypothyroidism, stress, or insulin resistance / diabetes, you may want to investigate PCOS as a potential underlying cause or secondary effect of your condition.

PCOS may be a complex condition but this does not mean that it is insurmountable. I myself overcame my own PCOS (despite receiving terrible medical advice). So many of the women I have worked with on the issue have, too.

To read more of my work on PCOS and find out how it’s unique from what other people have done, check out any of these posts: What is PCOS? PCOS Treatment OptionsThe PCOS Diet, or my program on overcoming PCOS, PCOS Unlocked: The Manual.

To read more about acne and it’s relationship to testosterone and other hormones, check out my most popular posts on acne, or my program, Clear Skin Unlocked: The Ultimate Guide to Acne Freedom and Flawless Skin.

So that’s it for common causes of high testosterone levels in women. Do you have other ones in your own experience? Questions, concerns? I’d love to hear about it – please let me know!

Hormonal Acne: New Science on How to Beat It – Keto for Women

Hormonal Acne: New Science on How to Beat It – Keto for Women

Even though many dermatologists would deny it, hormonal acne is a real and serious problem for women.

Gut health and inflammation are both major players in acne. (read more about causes of acne other than hormones in this post, or my brand new acne program, for 50% off this week!).

Yet hormones can be the biggest problem for women.

In today’s post I discuss all the variations of hormonal acne, where it comes from, and what to do about it.

Hormonal Acne: When and how it shows up

When: 

Hormonal acne for many women presents at certain times of the month. Popular times include 1) at ovulation, which occurs almost precisely smack in the middle of the cycle, two weeks after the first day of bleeding (read about how to pinpoint ovulation in this post), 2) the few days before a period, and 3) at the start of a woman’s period.

Hormonal acne can also be present all of the time. For women with hormonal problems such as PCOS (read here to start figuring out if you have PCOS) and Hypothalamic Amenorrhea (read here to figure out if you have HA), this is unfortunately the case.

When I had both PCOS and HA at the same time, I had terrible acne every day for three years.

Appearance: 

Hormonal acne usually occurs in the form of cysts. Cysts are those lovely, pus-filled, painful and inflamed red bumps. They often culminate in a peak of white pus.

Hormonal acne also appears as more mild forms called comedones. These are those whitehead “bumps” that never break the surface.

Hormonal acne can even show up just as smaller lesions. These are not quite as angry and painful as full out cysts, and may appear more rash-like or just smaller than typical acne. Below is a photo of my own cysts (on a “good” day) back in 2011.

Stage 3 Hormonal Acne

These are cysts, classified as “stage 3” acne by dermatologists. There are 4 stages of cysts in hormonal acne

Location: 

Hormonal acne occurs first and foremost around the mouth. It shows up on the chin, below the nose, around the sides of the mouth, and sometimes up the jawline.

As hormonal acne worsens, however, it spreads to the cheeks and the forehead.

Other body parts can be affected, too. This usually includes the shoulders, back, and buttocks–where the body’s testosterone receptors are most prominent.

The physiological mechanism of hormonal acne

Hormonal acne is caused by increased oil production beneath the skin. Think of it like a river. Ordinarily there is a healthy flow of oil to the surface. This is important because it lubricates the skin.

But when there is too much oil – and when it combines with the normal skin cells and other debris on the surface of the skin – it can clog the pores.

When oil clogs pores, bacteria go on a feeding frenzy. This causes inflammation.

The worse inflammation is, the more irritated the oil gland can become, and thus the more red, and the more painful.

Yet it is important to remember that hormonal acne does not occur unless there is an oil problem.

This is the reason no amount of washing will ever completely eliminate hormonal acne. Admittedly, it can be helped by antioxidant cleansers, serums, or creams.

But it will never go away completely without curing the hormonal acne from underneath. The only way to fix it is from the inside out.

Hormonal Acne: Causes of increased oil secretion

The primary causes of oil secretion are male sex hormones, also called androgens. Testosterone is the primary culprit. Another androgen, called DHEA-S, is also very important. They both increase oil secretion.

This effect is worsened when female sex hormone levels – particularly of estrogen – fall. Estrogen balances male sex hormones in the skin. Without a healthy balance, problems occur.

1. The most prominent androgen is testosterone.

Testosterone causes oil production in the skin.

Why might you have high testosterone?

You might have it if you have PCOS.

(Acne is one of the clearest indicators of PCOS.)

You may also have high testosterone if you have diabetes or insulin resistance, because when the body produces insulin, the ovaries produce testosterone. It’s a very simple yet very damaging process.

When might you show hormonal acne from high testosterone?

If you still have a menstrual cycle, you may find that you break out around ovulation. This is the middle of your cycle. It is also when your testosterone levels are the highest.

But if you have a hormone condition like PCOS – you will probably have hormonal acne most of the time.

(If you struggle with PCOS or think that you may have it, you may want to check out my handy guide on overcoming PCOS.)

2. Another androgen, called DHEA-S, causes oil production as well.

Yet unlike testosterone, which is a sex hormone, DHEA-S is a stress hormone.

It is produced primarily in the adrenal (stress) glands. Whenever a woman is under any degree of stress, her body faces a choice: it has to decide if it wants to produce normal sex hormones like progesterone and estrogen, or if it wants to produce stress hormones like DHEA-S.

For this reason, Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis dysregulation is usually the first place to look to as the origin of DHEA-S problems. Women with a lot of stress – whether from emotions, poor sleep, or under-feeding – have higher levels of DHEA-S levels.

3. Estrogen fights acne.

Estrogen helps promote clear skin. It does this in a number of ways.

First, it has the power to off-set high testosterone levels in the blood. Estrogen increases levels of sex-hormone-binding-globulin (SHBG), which in turn binds testosterone and makes it impotent.

Second, the skin has many estrogen receptors in it, so estrogen directly performs a balancing and soothing function at the site of acne.

For women with chronically low estrogen, hormonal acne is often a consistent problem. They have acne 100% of the time.

In women with relatively healthy hormone systems, low estrogen can still be a problem. This is because estrogen levels fall at the end of each menstrual cycle, and are low at the beginning. Having such low estrogen levels during this time can lead to monthly breakouts.

Because hypothalamic amenorrhea is characterized by low hormone, and particularly low estrogen levels, boosting estrogen is one of the main and most helpful ways women with hypothalamic amenorrhea cure their acne.

Because menopause significantly decreases estrogen levels–almost to zero–this is also the primary reason women in menopause can see a re-emergence of hormonal acne after decades of clear skin.

4. Finally, progesterone can also play a role in acne. Progesterone, in high doses, acts as an inflammatory agent, and can cause acne to flare up. Progesterone levels are highest during the days leading up to menstruation, which explains why many women experience outbreaks at this time.

Synthetic progesterone, such as that found in birth control pills, can also cause acne.

Whether a certain variety of the pill causes acne for you or not, however, is entirely dependent upon your own body chemistry and how your body reacts to external hormones. Know only that if you noticed a change in your skin while experimenting with birth control methods, this is most likely why. You may want to consider a birth control method that has a different kind of progesterone in it, or one that has a different progesterone-estrogen balance, to see if it helps relieve your acne.

(I discuss hormonal causes of acne with more complexity and depth in the program I just published, Clear Skin Unlocked: The Ultimate Guide to Acne Freedom and Flawless Skin.)

Aggravators of hormonal acne

There are many factors other than hormones that can worsen hormonal acne. Here is a list of the most common:

Stress: Stress plays an important role. It acts as an inflammatory agent, especially if cortisol levels remain high for a long time. Stress also  decreases production of healthy, skin-supporting hormones like estrogen, and increases production of acne-causing stress hormones like DHEA-S. Stress is not necessarily the cause of hormonal acne, but does exacerbate it, and prevent proper healing.

Heat.  Heat is inflammatory, and also causes sweat, which can clog pores.

UV Rays. The sun’s rays are some of the most potent acne inflamers out there. Protect the skin on your face with at least an SPF of 20, or consider wearing a hat in the summer months.

Inflammatory foods: grains, dairy, nuts, and omega 6 vegetable oils can all contribute to poor gut health and inflammation.

Dairy: While already mentioned for being inflammatory, dairy deserves special mention because it is a highly hormonal food.  Pregnant cows produce several hormones designed for growth. Growth hormones can both cause androgen levels to rise as well as promote production activities that lead to acne.

I have seen enormous success with women with hormonal acne eliminating dairy for their skin.  Many people at least anecdotally least respond to dairy with acne more strongly than any other food.

Phytoestrogens: soy and flax are the primary phytoestrogens to be concerned about, with legumes and nuts coming in a distant second place. Phytoestrogens (“phyto estrogen” is greek for “plant estrogen”) have the power to act as estrogens in the body. This may sound like a good thing for acne, but this role is ambivalent and should be treated with caution, especially with the skin. Different estrogen receptors read different kinds of phytoestrogens differently, such that phytoestrogens usually perform estrogen-lowering effects in skin tissue despite what they do in other locations.

Low carbohydrate diets: Having sufficient glucose stores is important for skin healing, and can speed the recovery of acne lesions. Glucose is also helpful for preventing hypothyroidism. Find out 8 of the most important signs you need to eat more carbohydrate here.

Poor sleep: Sleep both enables healing and promotes healthy hormonal production.

Hypothyroidism:  Without sufficient levels of T3, the active form of thyroid hormone, in the blood, a woman’s skin cells lack the ability to heal properly.  Many women who suffer hypothyroidism suffer chronic acne.

Dealing with hormonal acne

The best thing you can do for hormonal acne is get blood work done and figure out precisely what your underlying problem is. That way you can target the problem and treat it effectively.

Unfortunately not all of us can afford this, so it’s okay to guess. Nevertheless, the better an idea you have of what is going on in your body, the more specific you can be about what to do to fix it.

In general, hormone dysregulation that leads to acne can be broken down into a few broad categories:

1) high testosterone from PCOS (specifically the overweight and insulin resistant type of PCOS),

2) low estrogen from low body fat levels, chronic restriction, or living in an energy deficit,

3) low estrogen from menopause,

4) high progesterone from general hormone imbalance, possibly related to PMS,

5) any of these conditions worsened by stress or hypothyroidism, and

6) any combination therein.

The ultimate hormonal acne solution

The solution to all of these problems is to correct the hormone imbalance.  I have discussed methods of doing so above and elsewhere.

So to get rid of hormonal acne for good, check out my manual that has now helped several thousand women overcome their PCOS, or some of my work on hypothalamic amenorrhea.

For women with menopause, it may just “take time” or perhaps medical interventions are appropriate, depending on the severity of the problem.

Medication for hormonal acne?

There are drugs designed to help with hormonal acne.  Spironolactone and flutamide are the two primary ones that come to mind (though I don’t recommend taking either of them), as well as birth control.

The reason birth control pills are helpful for acne is because they enforce hormone regularity on a woman’s system.  The precise pill that is helpful for each woman varies by her particular condition– but in general, BCPs are comprised of estrogen and of progesterone. BCPs can for that reason 1) raise estrogen levels–which either corrects an estrogen deficiency or helps balance the activity of runaway testosterone–and they can also 2) restore proper balance between estrogen and progesterone, which is important for keeping progesterone levels within their proper parameters.

Some BCPs also contain anti-androgenic substances, such as drospirenone, which is an added benefit for women who are living with androgen excess (but poses some health risks).  In all cases, I do not generally recommend that women get on BCP, as it can cause worse hormonal dysregulation in the long run (sort of like handicapping a delicate hormonal system), and does not solve the underlying problem.

Flutamide acts in a similar way to spironolactone, but less effectively, and with more side effects.  So spironolactone is typically the drug of choice.

Spiro has been hailed by many acne sufferers as God’s gift to womankind: it decreases testosterone activity. For many women this begets truly miraculous effects. Yet one should step cautiously with spironolactone. If a woman’s primary problem is not testosterone excess, spironolactone will very likely do more harm for her skin than good.  (Check out the panicked discussion forums at acne.org to see what I’m talking about.)  Moreover, even for those who have testosterone excess as their primary problem, spironolactone merits caution for a variety of reasons.  First, spiro usually induces an infamous “initial breakout” which can last anywhere from weeks to months.  This isn’t always the case– sometimes women improve immediately. Sometimes they never really do (I never did: in fact, my acne got worse on spiro.) But the typical case is for women to see an initial worsening of their acne, followed by relief in the upcoming months, especially if they increase their dosages.

Secondly, spiro cannot be taken by pregnant women because it induces birth defects, so women cannot stay on spironolactone indefinitely. This is problematic because spironolactone acts as a band-aid on the hormone problem, and does nothing to fix it whatsoever. What spiro does simply is block testosterone receptors.  In most cases, if the underlying problem is not addressed while a woman is taking spironolactone, her acne will return once she comes off of the drug.  This is why I recommend that women only consider taking spironolactone if they want a “quick fix” while they work on their diet and exercise in order to improve their PCOS.

Finally, spironolactone has a couple of other health concerns.  First, it lowers blood pressure, since spiro is actually a blood pressure lowering drug proscribed “off label” for acne.  Secondly, it acts as a diuretic, so women on it need to drink water constantly, may not be able to consume alcohol anymore, may have dysregulated salt cravings, and may never actually be properly hydrated.  And finally, spiro acts as a potassium-sparing diuretic, such that women cannot eat potassium rich foods, lest they risk the chance of becoming hyperkalemic, which can lead to sudden death.  It hospitalized me. An imbalance of electrolytes in the blood is no laughing matter, so women on spiro should limit their potassium rich foods as well as get their potassium levels checked periodically.  Potassium rich foods include melons, bananas, potatoes, avocadoes, tomatoes, and leafy greens, among others.

For these reasons, spiro can help, but it cannot be relied on long term.  It does not get at the root of the issue–drugs rarely do–and the true path to hormonal help is diet and lifestyle modifcation.

As a final note, bio-identical hormone supplementation can be helpful for women going through menopause.  Estrogen patches can release small amounts of hormone into the bloodstream, and can lessen acne considerably. I do not think this is necessarily detrimental to a woman’s health, if it is in fact the case that her estrogen levels have simply dropped off during menopause.  However, it does, in my opinion, make it difficult for estrogen levels to rise and hormone balance to re-establish itself on its own. This is a decision best left to the individual and to her doctor.

In conclusion

Hormonal acne is terrible, and for many women can seem incessant, and never ending.  Girls are assured growing up that they will eventually out-grow their acne, yet many women see it persist throughout their twenties and thirties, and some actually do not even see the acne manifest until their twenties and thirties.  Some women do not even see acne appear until after the birth of their first children, as their progesterone and estrogen levels are flying all over the map.

There are downsides to medication, and large ones. Medication is only ever a band-aid, and it can be a band-aid that in the long run leads to more harm than good.  

Playing with hormones is like playing with fire.  Sometimes things can go horribly wrong. For this reason, meds may be best left alone, depending on the circumstance and the level of risk a woman is willing to bear.

—–

It is entirely possible as well as supremely healthy to cure acne from the inside out with good diet and lifestyle practices alone.

To do so with an experienced scientist (me!) walking you step-by-step through the process, check out my new program: Clear Skin Unlocked: The Ultimate Guide to Acne Freedom and Flawless Skin.

Clear Skin Unlocked was written specifically for women like you in mind. It’s for when you’re frustrated, looking for answers, and tired of falling through the cracks. In Clear Skin Unlocked I discuss everything I did in this blogpost here at much greater depth, as well as provide a Four  Week Jumpstart to Acne Freedom to get you on your way to robustly healthy and radiant skin, for good.

You may also wish to check out my guide on weight loss, or my guide to overcoming PCOS. It may take experimentation and patience, but don’t all good things, in the end?

For some of my favorite topical solutions to acne, check out the antioxidant cleansers, serumscreams and topical probiotics I use.

Not Taking These Vitamins? Here’s Why You Should

Not Taking These Vitamins? Here’s Why You Should

Where to Begin With Supplements

Taking supplements can be an overwhelming task to initiate. There are so many different varieties of vitamins & minerals, brands names of vitamins & minerals, and a lot of variation on mixed feelings about the successfulness of absorption rates. When I first decided to look more into proper supplementation, I must say I was slightly overwhelmed with the synergistic properties.

The fact that some supplements need to be paired with others in order to be fully absorbed was a concept that seemed beyond me, I wasn’t even sure which supplements to take that would work on their own. But! Alas, my wariness did not heed my eagerness to learn more, so I put my nose to the books and have come up with the ultimate basic list of supplements and what they can be used for. As always, I recommend getting your vitamins and minerals from the food you digest but I also understand that sometimes that is not possible in today’s crazy world. Enter the supplement. 

A Note: 

Some of the supplement information I have provided below does not elaborate on the synergistic qualities of supplements. For instance, Vitamin D is excellent for the immune system but also can provide relief from anxiety and depression. If you are browsing through and are not seeing a supplement that you had expected under a particular category, try reading through the other recommendations to see if there are alternative vitamins and minerals that can work for multiple symptoms. 

Negative Interactions: 

Calcium and Vitamin K2: If you are deficient in calcium and supplementing instead you may want to think twice, or do some research on your vitamin K levels. Vitamin K actually helps carry the Calcium into your bones, meaning if you are deficient in Vitamin K2 and supplementing with Calcium then you may not really be doing any good.  

Take this if Your Immune System Needs Help or If You Are Feeling Fatigued 

 

Vitamin D

 

Taking D3 keeps me cold-free all year long (literally, I got terrible colds until I started taking it), and keeps me from being depressed and anxious in winter months. If you don’t take cod liver oil, and even if you do but need more D, this is the supplement to take. Vitamin D is associated with overall improved health, and can help with diseases as advanced as cancer.

Vitamin D is one of the most important vitamins, and one we are most likely to be deficient in as Americans.  Some estimates say anywhere from 80-90% of the population may have sub optimal levels of Vitamin D in the blood.

This is worrying because Vitamin D plays such an important role in health.  From reducing autoimmune issues and inflammation, to preventing disease, Vitamin D is a nutrient we shouldn’t neglect. Vitamin D has a protective effect on the immune system, helping T-cells and B-cells to to fight immune threats while also preventing autoimmune issues. 

Several autoimmune diseases (including Lupus and MS) have a high range of deficiency and supplementation with Vitamin D has been shown to improve health in these individuals.

Having sufficient Vitamin D has been shown to reduce upper respiratory infections in both summer and winter.  Those with deficiencies of Vitamin D are found to suffer from upper respiratory infections much more often, even accounting for the seasons.  

Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, is primarily processed through the skin rather than through food.  During the summer, we wear less and tend to spend more time outdoors, and this increases the amount we produce.  In turn, we get sick less often and feel altogether happier.  Vitamin D deficiencies are also associated with lower mood and decreased cognitive function.

However, Vitamin D needs range depending on specific conditions.  Recommendations for average adults age 19-50 are about 600 i/u a day to prevent deficiency.  This can come from sunlight, diet, or supplements, but it may take up to 1500 or 2000 i/u a day, depending on the individual, to keep blood levels about the recommended 30 ng/ml.

Vitamin D foods: Salmon, Mushrooms (cooked), egg yolk, canned tuna, sardines and cod liver oil. 

 

 

Vitamin C

This vitamin is crucial for immune system health, for the manufacture of neurotransmitters, and for adrenal (stress system) health. 

Foods that contain Vitamin C: Leafy greens, other vegetables, and all fruits (yes, citrus, but others too!) all have high quantities of vitamin C. If you are a paleo dieter but don’t go heavy on the veggies you may want to consider upping your dose.

Vitamin C Supplement

Take this for Mood & Sleep Improvement

 

Magnesium

 

70% of Americans do not get the recommended daily dose of magnesium. And magnesium is crucial for more than 300 essential chemical reactions in the body. Without magnesium, these vital reactions simply don’t take place.

Without magnesium, systems malfunction all over the map, from bone growth to adrenal health to the ability to fall asleep at night. Magnesium is also, and perhaps most importantly, one of the primary nutrients involved in the regulation of cellular stress and activity. And when I say stress here, I do mean stress. Any sort of cellular activity is a stress of sorts, because it upregulates activity and requires energy and resources.

Magnesium’s role is simple: it opens channels on cell membranes. When a muscle fiber, for example, needs to tense up and become active, magnesium will open the membrane and help usher in calcium, which helps make it tense. Then, when the period of stress is over and the muscle can relax, magnesium opens up the cell membrane to usher the calcium out of the cell again. The problem for most people is that they have enough magnesium to usher calcium into the cell, but not enough to usher the calcium out.

This leaves them in a chronically up-regulated state, leaving muscles tense, nerves firing, and neurons on high alert. This is why magnesium deficiency is associated with muscle tension, with headaches, with poor adrenal health, and with anxiety.

Without magnesium, the body simply cannot calm down.

Magnesium is very hard to get in a paleo diet (really only in grains) and is CRUCIAL for over 300 enzymatic reactions in the body. You need it to prevent headaches, relax your muscles, calm anxiety, prevent depression, and fall asleep at night, among so many other things. At one point it nearly saved my life.This is the form of magnesium that is easiest on the gut. Other forms in high doses can cause intestinal motility to speed up enough to cause diarrhea. This one is the best for avoiding that if you have a sensitive stomach.

High quality magnesium citrate supplement

Magnesium Foods

As important as magnesium is, it unfortunately is no longer abundant in the human diet. Research estimates that at least 48% of Americans do not get nearly enough magnesium in their diets. This is in part because magnesium has been depleted from American soils.

Unfortunately for paleo dieters, the majority of foods high in magnesium are not on the typical paleo menu. High magnesium foods include mostly legumes, nuts and seeds: soybeans, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, quinoa, black beans, cashews, navy beans, sunflower seeds, almonds. Grains are also reasonably high in magnesium.

Fortunately for paleo dieters, kale, swiss chard, and beet greens are all great sources. Nevertheless, magnesium is probably one of the greatest “risk” minerals for paleo dieters, which is why I typically recommend supplementing.

Take this if You’re Breaking Out

 

Zinc 

 

Zinc is an essential mineral that is not only found in several enzymes–which makes it crucial to lots of bodily functions–but it also, notably, is critical for immune system function. It also plays a key role in the metabolism of RNA and DNA, and promotes plasticity (flexibility) in the brain. It is important for immune health, hormone health, insulin modulation, and brain health. Zinc also has anti-inflammatory properties that resist and combat bacteria, making it wonderful for helping acne relief. 

Zinc foods:

The best sources of zinc are oysters (by almost a factor of ten), followed by liver, beef, and lamb. Turkey and shrimp also have good amounts of zinc. From plants, zinc can be obtained from lentils, quinoa, chick peas, and many kinds of seeds including pumpkin and sesame seeds.

High quality Zinc supplement

Take this if You’re Trying to Heal Your Gut 

 

Vitamin A

 

This vitamin is rare because even though you think you might be getting it every time you eat a carrot (the packaging always says “good source of vitamin A!”), you are unfortunately being misled. Carrots do not have vitamin A in them. Neither do any other plant foods. What these foods have in them instead is beta carotene.

Beta carotene can be converted into vitamin A in your intestines by gut flora (here’s a great probiotic and great probiotic foods that can help with that). If you do not have the right gut flora it just won’t happen. Unfortunately that’s the case for a lot of people today. Gut flora just aren’t as robust as they could be.

So many people are deficient in vitamin A. The only robust source of true vitamin A in the diet is organ meat, particularly liver. Most people cringe at the idea of eating liver. Yet ancestral human cultures prized the liver above almost all other parts of the animal. Presumably this is because they figured out how important it is for health. If you cannot stomach the idea of eating liver a couple of times a month (but you should because it’s delicious), you can try a desiccated liver supplement like this one, which is my favorite.

You can also obtain vitamin A from cod liver oil, which is actually a better supplement for absorbing vitamin A specifically because oil is the right form for a fat soluble vitamin. (Desiccated liver is the best for a lot of other nutrients, though, including the rare and important choline). Most people do well with 10-15,000 IU’s per day. 

This is the healthiest, most nourishing cod liver oil supplement on the market today.

Take This if You Are Combating Brain Fog

 

Vitamin K

 

Vitamin K is rare in the diet today for a few reasons. One is that people do not eat organ meats anymore, and organ meats are one of the only good sources of vitamin K2.

Another reason is that most animals today are raised on grain products and other random bits of food instead of grass. Yet grass is the natural diet for cows, bison, and other ruminants. The highest quality beef comes from cows that eat grass specifically because it enables them to make the right nutrients that they need.

Vitamin K2 can be found in grass-fed butter, but it cannot be found in grain-fed butter. So you can boost your vitamin K (K2, specifically) intake by getting some grass-fed butter in your diet. If you cannot do that, then you may definitely want to consider that cod liver oil supplement I mentioned earlier. Because not only does it have cod liver oil and vitamins A and D in it, but it also has high quality butter oil added, which is rich in vitamin K.

This is how fermented cod liver oil kills three birds with one stone. Most people will do well with 100 mcg/d. 

 

Vitamin B2

 

Vitamin B2, also known as riboflavin, is necessary for energy production and normal cell function and growth.

Riboflavin deficiency is common in women of child-bearing age and of a low socioeconomic level. Using hormonal birth control exacerbates that problem. Studies have shown that vitamin supplements remediate riboflavin issues in women taking the pill.

Altogether, these findings suggest that vitamin B2 supplementation in women taking OCs may be important where vitamin nutrition is poor.

B2 foods

Greens, eggs, turkey, other sources of animal protein, and plant protein sources such as beans and legumes tend to be good sources of vitamin B2. With a diet rich in animal products, vegetables, and fruits, B2 should probably not be a problem to obtain enough of. Not many sources of B2 are excellent sources, but there is a wide variety of foods which contain a decent amount of it.

High quality B complex supplement

 

If Your Liver is Needing Assistance Detoxing 

 

Vitamin B12

 

Vitamin B12 (also known as cobalamin) is an essential nutrient for many things, but perhaps most of all liver support and detox.

B12 foods

Vitamin B12 is fortunately very rich in pretty much all animal protein sources, especially liver. But beef, lamb, poultry, seafood, and eggs all have fairly abundant B12. Dairy also has a reasonable amount of B12 in it. If you are a vegetarian, and especially if you are a vegan, you will need to supplement with B12.

If you struggle already with a slugglish liver or have a condition like estrogen dominance or PCOS, the following supplements help support the liver through Phase I and Phase II detoxification and can be really helpful:

  • Methylated forms of B12 (find it here), B6 (find it here), and Folic Acid (find it here): important for the passing of methyl groups which helps with the excretion of hormones like estrogen and is sometimes difficult in women with PCOS.
  • DIM (I like this one): contains the strongest components of cruciferous vegetables known to help break down excess hormones.
  • Calcium D Glucarate (I like this brand) supports the glucuronidation of  the liver and prevents excess estrogen from being re-absorbed in the bowels.
  • Glutathione (find it here): important for the detoxification of alcohol. Smoking, chronic stress, and infections or inflammatory disorders also deplete this important nutrient
  •  

So there you have it! Where will you be starting on your supplementing journey? Maybe you are sticking to food instead? Leave me a comment and let me know! 

What the location of your breakouts really means

What the location of your breakouts really means

Our body uses its own particular language to communicate problems to us. This may be in the form of an ache, pain, or of all things, a pimple. Our body is literally trying to talk to us to tell us something is not  aligning with our physiology, and we need to learn that language.

It may be difficult to decipher this language, but no worries I’ve got your back!

We now have enough science and research behind us demonstrating that the locations of our breakouts can be caused by certain things.

For instance, if I eat dairy (an inflammatory food for me) I break out around my chin or jaw line. This is something that took me a decent amount of time to comprehend, but now that I have, it is a very reliable way to understand my skin.

So, what are the main things causing breakouts?

Acne primarily originates from two things, our diet and our hormones.

How Hormones Affect Our Skin

The most problematic hormones for your skin are the male sex hormones, called androgens a group. The two most prominent ones are testosterone and DHEA-S.​​Testosterone​​​ is a male sex hormone that you’ve probably heard about. It’s produced in reproductive organs in every body, though at much higher rates in men than in women. DHEA-S ​is not a sex hormone.  It is produced by the stress glands (adrenal glands) in the body. But it resembles male sex hormones so much that it has androgenizing effects in the body. The body has unusually high concentrations of androgen receptors in certain areas:  

  • around the mouth
  • the chin
  • the jaw
  • the forehead
  • the shoulders
  • upper back
  • glutes

So What Does This Mean?

Androgens or male sex hormones cause the body to do two things, make more sebum than what is normal, and boost skin cell growth rates. Too much male hormones means too much growth. Too much male hormone power in the blood means too much growth. When these growth processes occur with too much frequency or intensity, acne develops.

Check out my article here to learn more about whether you may have too much testosterone.

When we are able to eliminate hormones as the cause of our breakouts, (check out my program Clear Skin Unlocked if hormones could be the primary factor causing your breakouts.) we can then look at the next most inflammatory thing, our diet.

Dietary Factors Causing Acne

Unfortunately, there are a lot of dietary reasons we could be breaking out. A lot of them stem from causing inflammation in our bodies. The following are some of the main dietary reasons we develop breakouts :

  • A diet high in omega 6 fats
  • A diet high in deep fried and fried foods
  • A diet that includes trans fats
  • A diet low in omega 3 fats DHA and EPA relative to the amount of omega 6 in the diet
  • A diet high in refined and added sugars
  • A diet high in grains or dairy

I know this seems like a lot. If you have been following a paleo diet then most of these will not be an issue for you. If not, I recommend starting by eliminating processed foods, and go from there. I have more tips on how to do this, located in my program Clear Skin Unlocked, here.

So what do the locations of our breakouts mean?

  1. The Chin and Jaw & Neck : The highest concentration of testosterone receptors are found in the skin here. If you have a hormone imbalance you will likely see pimples in this area in a range of sizes. These can occur often around our menstrual cycles, when our hormones are fluctuating.
  2. Cheeks : We use our phones a lot, right? Make sure you are cleaning your phone often otherwise you are introducing loads of foreign bacteria to your face here. In addition, if you are smoking, this has a habit of showing in the cheeks because this area is believed to be linked to our respiratory system.  
  3. Chest : Our chest is a very sensitive area that we can sometimes forget about when it comes to washing and cleaning our face and other areas of the skin. Definitely take extra time to make sure you are washing your chest adequately. If that doesn’t do it, and your breakouts are happening in  the summer, check out this blog post on other things that may be causing the breakouts to occur.
  4. Forehead, upper back and glutes : There are also testosterone receptors found in these areas, not as potent as around the mouth. but they are real. This combined with natural sweat and dirt can cause serious breakouts.  


So – long story short, we should be looking to our hormones first to understand if we have any imbalances that could be causing breakouts, especially in the jaw, chin, forehead, upper back & glutes.

Here are a few more resources for understanding hormone imbalances and what your breakouts mean:

Hormone Balance and Inflammation

Cystic Acne and Hormones: Everything You Need to Know

The Ultimate Hormonal Acne Treatment Plan

5 Signs You Suffer From High Testosterone

Then, we look to our diet.

As we pay more attention to our skin and the contributing environmental and dietary factors in our life that may be influencing it, I promise it will become easier to understand and recognize where these breakouts are coming from and why. I am a big fan of journaling, especially to notice stress levels which could really be causing inflammation to spike.

Best of luck, and as always, I am always here.

 

<3

Sneaky Causes of Summer Breakouts

Sneaky Causes of Summer Breakouts

Here I am, thinking about how only a few months ago I had my winter skin regime down to a science. I had found the perfect combination of skin products to use and when to use them. Then, summer comes along and reminds me that our skin is a living changing organ and that we need to rotate our skin regimes throughout the year.

The changing of the seasons doesn’t usually mess with my skin, mainly because I have spent so much time testing a regime that works for me. However, the years that spring is non-existent and we leap into summer without warning can without warning, lead to unexpected breakouts.

This is one of those years. I have had several breakouts and have been trying to track all the things that could be contributing to this annoying part of my life.

Diet? Just fine.

Skin care products? Even better.

So what gives?!  I am sure there are a few things you can think of that could contribute to summer breakouts. Hotter weather means more sweat, etc. The following are the most common sneaky causes of summer breakouts.

Sneaky Causes of Summer Breakouts

 

  • Sweat : Sweat doesn’t necessarily clog your pores. It is only when sweat mixes with oil and bacteria on your face that these breakouts occur. If you are using a lot of product on your face and are sweating on top of that, all that goodness starts to mix up and get stuck in your pores. If you are in a situation where you need to wear product on your face and happen to be in a sweaty environment, then just make sure you are washing your face afterward with a gentle cleanser. This brings me to my next point:

 

  •  Overwashing : When we are sweating and moving all day we tend to feel stickier and like we need to shower more often. This can lead to over washing, which will strip the face of its natural oil causing it to overproduce oil. This reaction caused from unbalanced oil composition can result with more breakouts. Stick to washing your face in the morning or evening, and try to only spot treat after that. If you are curious about other tips for info on keeping your skin clear, check out my program, Clear Skin Unlocked.

 

  • Sunscreen : Sunscreen can be full of ingredients that clog your pores. There was a time as a teenager when I would break out constantly because of poor quality sunscreen. My skin burns very easily and I would grab whatever sunscreen was accessible to prevent this. Because the ingredients in sunscreen vary, the results it may have on your skin will vary. If you are looking for a safer sunscreen that won’t clog your pores, check out this one.

 

  • Sunburns : If you are foregoing the sunscreen all together, then you are probably getting burned or some type of mild sun damage. Sunburns are truly awful for our skins composition. The skin burns and dies and peels off, forcing it to regrow. This may sound like a rejuvenating thing, but it really is forcing your skin into overdrive, drying it out which can lead us back to point 2. If you do get a sunburn, apply aloe as a natural moisturizing remedy.

 

  • Other Foreign Products : Things like bug spray, artificial tanner, heavier moisturizers, and general environmental toxins will cause breakouts, especially with the increased amount of time we spend outside in the warmer months. Try sourcing safer products with non-toxic ingredients when possible, and if not possible, try to limit your exposure to these products.

 

  • Outliers : If none of these reasons add up, I highly recommend checking out my program, Clear Skin Unlocked. My no-strings-attached program can help you decipher whether hormone imbalance, autoimmune conditions, or even leaky gut amongst other things can be contributing to breakouts. Get it here.

 

 

My Summer Regime:

I think I may be suspect of overwashing this time around and have been careful to tread lightly around my washing regime. Currently, I have been using the following to keep breakouts at bay:

Lightweight Hydrating Moisturizer : I typically apply a thin layer of this in the morning and it allows breathable moisture all day. Get it here.

Countersun Sunscreen : Beautycounter’s sunscreen is well known for being free of chemicals and junk, and it also doesn’t make me break out which is rare for a sunscreen. Get it here.

Portable Face Wipes : These are great on the go for when you are traveling and may be extra sweaty. I keep these on hand to wipe off my back and chest when I am traveling. Get them here.

 

Do you get summer breakouts? Is it just me? Let me know what works for your pesky summer breakouts.

 

<3 Me!

Why You Should Be Putting Probiotics On Your Face

Why You Should Be Putting Probiotics On Your Face

It’s no secret that probiotics can have a positive impact on our happiness, health and wellbeing. Leading industry professionals advocate that a balanced gut microbiome can lead to a healthier life overall. And even more recently, balanced gut bacteria has been studied in cases revealing a reduction in insulin resistance,  better overall mental health, reducing effects of autoimmune conditions, and even weight loss.

These studies have been conducted using oral consumption of probiotic supplements or eating probiotic foods. Think kimchi, sauerkraut, kefir, unpasteurized milk products and kombucha, or an actual probiotic supplement like this one.

I am no stranger to using probiotics to improve my gut health. I frequently use probiotics to improve my skin health too. I have been using topical probiotics for years as a way to combat my incessant acne.

I know it seems weird to use probiotics topically, but intradermal consumption is one of the fastest and most efficient ways for probiotics to penetrate our skin barriers.

Medical professionals argue that acne is caused by bacteria. If you have ever experimented with an elimination diet or eliminated foods like dairy (or any other inflammatory food) for a period of time and immediately been the victim of a breakout shortly after, you know that facial bacteria may not be the sole cause.

And usually we have a gut feeling about what is causing our acne, at least to a certain extent. If you are still unsure what may be the root cause of your acne, check out my program, Clear Skin Unlocked for additional ways to narrow down the acne causing culprits, like a true detective.

If you already have a clear idea of what may be causing your acne, and you have eliminated the culprit but are still having breakouts, then an imbalance of facial bacteria could be in effect.

And that’s where topical probiotics come in.

Are They Necessary?

If you are consistently struggling with breakouts but have had absolutely no luck in treating them, I really recommend giving topical probiotics a try. We already know about the insanely amazing benefits that probiotics have on our gut, and these benefits occur because a balance is being restored. Which points to an important clue to why we may be having breakouts.

Everyday we are frequently being subjected to toxins and bacteria and a combination of external things that shouldn’t be on our face. This is well known amongst my city dwelling friends who experience pollution particles, often on a much broader scale. All of these foreign particles can cause an imbalance of bacteria on our face.

It’s pretty disgusting to think about so I try not to stress myself out obsessing over it. One thing I changed was correcting my habit of touching my face frequently.

To bring it all in – Topical probiotics allow our skin to continue to cultivate its natural microbiome and remain balanced.

Added Benefits of Topical Probiotics

I know from my own personal testing that probiotics can have a positive impact on my skin. I am able to maintain a healthier glow and a better grasp on keeping my skin acne free almost all of the time. Topical probiotics can have the following additional effects according to one of our favorite, no-nonsense beauty scientists at AnnMarie:

—Naturally calm skin that is reactive to environmental stressors

—Strengthen the skin’s lipid barrier, combating dryness

—Balance skin pH, restoring a healthy complexion

—Improve overall skin hydration, enhancing skin suppleness

—Eliminate harmful impurities that disrupt the skin’s defense mechanisms

—Reduces the appearance of temporary redness and other skin burdens

Bonus Ingredients

I recently have been using this probiotic serum from AnnMarie, and it has been stabilizing any acne on my face while also not being harsh on my skin (Y’all know I have very sensitive skin, so this was a great relief knowing that it worked well for me). This particular topical probiotic has only a few ingredients, including Tremella mushrooms. Tremella is known for its medicinal properties, and its use dates back centuries. Read more on everything awesome Tremella Mushrooms can do for us, here.

We recently discussed the properties of adaptogenic herbs including mushrooms. It is enthralling how a fungi has existed for so long and continues to benefit us in so many various, unexpected ways.

A few other bonus ingredients in the Probiotic Serum with Tremella include:

Bio-ferments – Biofermentation means that fermentation occured to increase the stability and nutrient availability. Basically, it is mimicking the fermentation process in nature.

Plankton Extract- this extract has been thought to delay the aging process (Yay!)) Plankton is an excellent moisturizer and humectant to boot.

Natural Herbs – this probiotic contains a medley of herbs to provide a natural scent and powerhouse of nutrients. Ingredients include plantain, dandelion, comfrey and nettle.

I also want to note that AnnMarie advocates that the product is suitable for all skin types, including sensitive skin. I obviously only have the skin I have, so let me know if you try it and have similar or different results. I have tested a few different kinds of topical probiotics and would love to get feedback on the types that are working for different skin types.

How to Use Topical Probiotics

I typically use this serum after I have washed my face and before I apply moisturizer. It carries a scent that I like to think it the AnnMarie signature scent…It is woodsy and almost slightly smoky but in a refreshing, satisfying way.

 

So, do I have you convinced that topical probiotics could really benefit you? If not, check out this bonus blog post discussing in more depth the reasons why topical probiotics are here to stay.